Old South Military Antiques

CS and Stars Two Piece Belt Buckle
Item #: OS-7244


This officer’s belt buckle is a true rarity. It is attributed to Leech & Rigdon-Memphis Novelty Works in Confederate Buckles and Plates. As best I can find out, this is simply a guess based on the use of stars on Leech & Rigdon spurs, and that they are found in the Tennessee theater. This attribution may or may not eventually prove to be correct. What is certain is that it is a very attractive plate, and an exceedingly rare buckle.

This beautiful excavated example has one of the most complete provenance archives that I have ever encountered with a Confederate buckle or plate.

The tongue portion was excavated by Joseph A. Austin, in northeast Selma, Alabama near Range Street, or the "Plantersville Road” as it was known when the buckle was lost. A notarized statement from Mr. Austin, giving the details of the find accompanies the buckle.
Three years later, Robert Gordon excavated the wreath portion in Selma, near the intersection of Dallas & Broad Streets. A notarized statement from Mr. Gordon, giving the details of the find accompanies the buckle.
Subsequently Mr. Jeff Hinson acquired both pieces and found that they matched as perfectly. First he sent it to Dr. Bill Blackman, (CS buckle collector extraordinaire) who believed it to be authentic, then he it to Mr. Steve E. Mullinax, who notarized signed statement testifying to its originality. Still later it was sent to Mr. Lewis Leigh for authentication. Mr. Leigh’s and Mr. Mullinax's signed statements testifying to the buckle’s originality are included in the archive.
The buckle was brought to me at the 2021, Dalton, Georgia show, without being aware of any of the provenance laid out above, I readily pronounced it authentic. It comes with my letter of authenticity as well as the aforementioned.

The 46 by 77 mm buckle retains a perfect body curve and it’s condition is as fine as an excavated buckle could possibly be. It is flawless!

Not for Sale