Old South Military Antiques

C S “Rope Border” Waist Belt
Item #: OS-6846

  Plate is perfect!



  The belt still has original finish under the plate


  Some finish still remains on the belt, under where the plate often fastens


  Belt is super strong


The Confederate waist belt pictured here is known as a "Rope Border” because of the twisted rope design encircling its inner border. The plate was manufactured by die stamping the pattern into a thin sheet of brass and then soldering three brass hooks onto the reverse. This style of plate was issued to primarily Confederate infantrymen serving in the Western theatre, but is occasionally found in the Eastern Theatre.

These plates are rarely encountered in non excavated condition and when they are, they almost invariably are mounted on a Yankee belt; perhaps done during the War or perhaps put on recently by modern collectors. I am very particular in this respect; unless a buckle has every indication of having been on its belt virtually forever, I assume that it has not been and pass it by, or only consider its buckle value. In every way, this plate appears to be on its original leather belt. The belt also has a line tooled into its upper and lower borders, a characteristic which is never found in its Yankee counterpart. The plate’s natural untouched patina has highlighted the belts outline, leaving what is termed a "ghost” of the belt; the presence of which indicates long and constant contact between the brass and belt. This one has been on the belt so long that the impression of the two hooks pressing against its reverse surface is apparent.

The belt’s untouched, original condition is excellent, strong and supple throughout. The initials VMW are carved into it, but the name has long since been lost. through war and time, the belt remains attractive and strong enough to mount on a mannequin. Both the plate and its original belt are perfection.

The value of a Rope Border buckle is between $5,500.00 and $6,000.00. The value of belt it is on is totally relative to how sure one can be that it is on its original belt. For example, a non-excavated Richmond two piece sword buckle is valued at approximately 4000.00. If it is onits belt, it is worth approximately 12,000.00. This is because it is sewn on, if the stitching is original, one can determine that the buckle is on its original belt, thus, the three fold increase in value.

Most oval and rectangular plates that are in encountered on a belt are not on their original belt, therefore the price increase is minimal. However, once in very rare while, one comes along that is unquestionably on its original belt. Those that are on their unquestionably original belt then command two, and in one case I am aware of, three times the price of a plate alone.

In the case of this belt, the extremely heavy ghost under the plate and around the hooks, as well as the keeper end of the belt leave no doubt at all that this is the plates’ original belt, yet I purchased it at a good value and can pass that savings on to you. This belt can be bought for only $8,400.00. This may seem high to those that have been looking at other sites that have plates that are "on original belt” Note the exact wording; this is used to intentionally deceive, they leave out the word "an” or "its” meaning that it is on "an” original belt, but not its own; it has been put on an original Yankee belt recently.

This is an issue that the novice is unaware of, until he tries to sell it, then those same people who sold it "on original” belt point out that it is not on "its” original belt in order to buy it back cheap. Novice be warned.


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