Old South Military Antiques

Stunning CS, GS, Regulation Artillery Frock Coat
Item #: OS-6163

  The soldier in the upper image is Billy Chattin, my g- uncle, killed in Pickett's Charge







  The two lower buttons have been resewn, but I believe to be original also


  Nairy a blemish!


Stunning seems an understatement. This is without a doubt the most colorful Confederate regulation uniform that I have ever seen in over thirty years of collecting. The coat is finely tailored of the best English wool, and faced with fiery red broadcloth. What makes this Artillery Captain’s frock stand apart from all others is the breast lining of the same red broadcloth, so that when the breast was buttoned back (with those gorgeous Confederate staff officer buttons) the officer was oozing with red blooded Southern patriotism. There was a good reason for such finery. The officer served on a General’s Staff.

The coat’s cadet grey wool exterior is in near new condition. The green satinet liner shows extensive wear, but remains in good condition. The broadcloth branch of service facings show extensive wear, but remain in excellent condition. All eighteen of the coats "EXTRA RICH TREBLE GILT” stamped buttons are original to the coat and all have their original stitching intact with the exception of two of the tail buttons that have been resewn. The six CS staff officer cuff buttons are original and carry the same "EXTRA RICH TREBLE GILT” backmarks.

The coat still having its original General Staff Officer’s buttons tells us that the Captain was on a General’s Staff or served as Aide-de-camp. This would account for the extra fine materials and tailoring.

In the Confederate Army, Brigadier Generals were assigned a staff of intelligent and well-educated officers. The principal staff officer held the title of Assistant Adjutant-General, occasionally appended with the duties of Inspector-General. There was also at least one Aide-de-camp, often a talented friend or relative who was selected by the General who also served as a confidential advisor.

Property of Chas. I Dial is inked on the inside of one sleeve. The style of writing appears to me to be post War; nor can I find any Confederate Captain by that name, so my suspicion is that this was the officer’s son, or perhaps a captor’s name. If it was the officer’s son the coat could probably be identified with careful research.

This stunning frock coat is in excellent condition, as the photos show. The artillery branch of service colors remain brilliant. The rarity and condition of this coat mark it as one of the very best in public or private collections.

Stunning seems an understatement. This is without a doubt the most colorful Confederate regulation uniform that I have ever seen in over thirty years of collecting. The coat is finely tailored of the best English wool, and faced with fiery red broadcloth. What makes this Artillery Captain’s frock stand apart from all others is the breast lining of the same red broadcloth, so that when the breast was buttoned back (with those gorgeous Confederate staff officer buttons) the officer was oozing with red blooded Southern patriotism. There was a good reason for such finery. The officer served on a General’s Staff.

The coat’s cadet grey wool exterior is in near new condition. The green satinet liner shows extensive wear, but remains in good condition. The broadcloth branch of service facings show extensive wear, but remain in excellent condition. All eighteen of the coats "EXTRA RICH TREBLE GILT” stamped buttons are original to the coat and all have their original stitching intact with the exception of two of the tail buttons that have been resewn. The six CS staff officer cuff buttons are original and carry the same "EXTRA RICH TREBLE GILT” backmarks.

The coat still having its original General Staff Officer’s buttons tells us that the Captain was on a General’s Staff or served as Aide-de-camp. This would account for the extra fine materials and tailoring.

In the Confederate Army, Brigadier Generals were assigned a staff of intelligent and well-educated officers. The principal staff officer held the title of Assistant Adjutant-General, occasionally appended with the duties of Inspector-General. There was also at least one Aide-de-camp, often a talented friend or relative who was selected by the General who also served as a confidential advisor.

Property of Chas. I Dial is inked on the inside of one sleeve. The style of writing appears to me to be post War; nor can I find any Confederate Captain by that name, so my suspicion is that this was the officer’s son, or perhaps a captor’s name. If it was the officer’s son the coat could probably be identified with careful research.

This stunning frock coat is in excellent condition, as the photos show. The artillery branch of service colors remain brilliant. The rarity and condition of this coat mark it as one of the very best in public or private collections.
The uniform will arrive at your door mounted and ready to display, just as you see it here.

(This Staff Officer's coat has intrigued me and aroused my curiosity. I find that there is little information on Confederate Staff Officers in print or online. If any of my readers know of a publication dealing with the operations of the Confederate Staff service, or have an intimate knowledge of Staff operations in the Confederate Army, I would love to hear from you.)
Price $55,000.00 USD

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